05 February 2017

Clark's birth story


I've been wanting to share Clark's birth story for months but wrestled with which details to share here and which ones to keep to ourselves or, at least, keep off of the internet. Finally at six months postpartum, here is the birth story of our sweet little boy Clark Wilder.


I was in the shower when our midwife Kelly got to our house. After hours of laboring, shivering and struggling to keep any food or drink down, Chris suggested that a warm shower might feel nice. I had been drifting in and out of sleep since midnight, laboring through contractions that often came just a few minutes apart. Once I got into the shower, I finally felt like a powerful, confident birthing mama. The hot water was soothing, distracting and also helped relieved my nausea. I stayed in there for 45 wonderful minutes, gathering strength and courage as labor progressed. I was surprised by the intensity of the contractions and how short the break was between each of them but it still hadn't sunk in that I would give birth to our son soon.

The day before, we had gone to my third and final biophysical profile exam and received word that everything was still good with Baby. Chris went off to work and I bought myself two scoops of mint chocolate chip ice cream for lunch. In the afternoon when I told Kelly that I thought I felt slight cramps, she said that was great progress and that she was sure I'd have my baby soon! Chris suggested I start a little labor project, so off to the kitchen I went to bake a batch of cookies and dance around to Florence and the Machine. I gave Clark a pep talk, telling him that it was okay if he was scared because I was too but that we both needed to be brave. I told him that we would get through this part together and that I would keep him safe. I told him that we had waited so long for this day. I told him that his dad and I couldn't wait to see his beautiful face. I told him that I was ready.

Chris and I made dinner and watched Hillary accept the Democratic nomination for president. At around 9:30 I called Kelly and let her know that the contractions were still easy but coming about 15 minutes apart. She said to have a glass of wine and try to get some rest! We stayed up too late watching Hillary's speech, thinking we still had many hours (days even?) before our son would finally arrive.

Flash forward to the middle of the night. I'm wrapped up in a blanket, fighting off chills and watching the clock, telling myself to just make it until 3am, 4am, just get through the night until the sun came up. The sun did come up, I stepped into that warm shower and Clark's birth day was upon us.



After I got out of the shower Kelly checked me, gave me anti-nausea medicine and placed an IV to help me rehydrate. I remember Kelly saying at a prenatal appointment that the two most common reasons for transferring to the hospital are maternal exhaustion and dehydration. After a restless night and hours of vomiting, the IV was a good idea indeed.

I labored mostly in bed. When I had imagined homebirth, I assumed that I would pass the time peacefully walking around our house, eating the labor snacks we bought and quitely breathing through contractions. Ok. So now is the time when I would like to humbly state that birth is intense. And beautiful and powerful and life-altering, but intense. Birth brought me to my knees, swept me into a hazy, timeless world and connected me to our animal nature in a way I hadn't imagined.

I was vaguely aware of Kelly and her two birth assistants quietly shuffling around our bedroom, taking supplies out of our birth kit and making sure everything was ready for Baby's arrival. Chris held my hand, rubbed my back and told me how strong I was and how proud he was of me. The few times he had to step away, Kelly or Kristen or Amanda would swoop in and hold my hand and hold space for me and my baby. The atmosphere was calm and loving.

Kelly said that whenever I felt pressure I could start pushing. So I did, and oh my pushing is hard work. It was the hardest part of labor for me and took every bit of strength I had. Chris and the team were so good about encouraging me and quietly cheering me on. I needed that reinforcement and support. In between contractions I drifted off into a semi-sleep and the room went quiet. At one point I asked Kelly how much longer I had to push and she said, "Oh, not much longer," which I immediately recognized as her gentle way of saying I might still have, in fact, a lot longer to go. The second time I asked her, though, she looked into my eyes and said, "Minutes, Christine. Just a few minutes." I knew I could do anything for a few more minutes, especially if it meant our baby would be here. Chris held my hand, kissed my face and told me how proud he was of me.

After about 45 minutes of pushing, I birthed our baby boy into the world. Kelly caught him and said, "It's time for you to meet your mama!" before putting him right on my belly.

The moment he was born, the fog of labor completely lifted. I cuddled him as Kelly rubbed his arms and legs and wiped him off. I don't remember if he took a breath right away, but soon enough he did and let out a little cry too. He stayed on me for the next hour while they checked his vitals and cleaned him up. Chris cut the umbilical cord and I birthed the placenta. I lost more blood than Kelly was comfortable with so she gave me a medication to help slow the bleeding. Then the ladies went downstairs to do paperwork. We were alone with our baby! Our son was here! Kristen, one of the birth assistants, came upstairs a few times to check on us and help us to start breastfeeding. She also so sweetly brought us up a cheese plate with crackers, pesto and blueberries– we finally got to eat those labor snacks! We were blissed out.

After an hour or so I showered and then the ladies gave Clark his newborn exam and we all sat around trying to guess his weight. (I guessed correctly at 7 lbs 5 oz!) He was beautifully alert and stared right up at Kelly as she checked him out. The next few hours are a lovely blur of staring at our new baby. Our midwife and assistants cleaned up, started laundry and tucked us into bed before leaving around 5pm. We called our parents to share the good news and started texting friends.


And just like that, there were three of us. We stayed in bed for hours and watched our little one begin to figure out the world. Chris made a quick dinner and brought it upstairs for us. We stayed up until we couldn't keep our eyes open any longer and then we all dozed off for a much-needed night of sleep. I stayed upstairs most of the next day, tucked away in our cocoon. Our midwives came back to check in on us several times over the next few weeks, yet another wonderful part of the homebirth model. They came upstairs and sat on the bed, or we'd gather in the living room to talk, wherever we happened to be at the time. They weighed and measured and monitored Clark, helped us both with breastfeeding and checked on how I was doing too.

Looking back on Clark's birth, I'm filled with joy and gratitude. It's true that your mind quickly dulls memories of the pain of childbirth, because not even a day later I thought, "Well that wasn't so bad." Giving birth was intense and all-encompassing but I knew I could do it. I was surrounded by people who believed in my strength and believed in the natural birth process. I trusted them to safely guide me and my baby through this experience. I leaned heavily on Chris for the calm, steady support that he constantly provides me, and he was amazing.

You should give birth wherever you feel most safe and comfortable, but may I suggest that you consider homebirth and the midwifery model of care? You can see a midwife throughout pregnancy and safely, calmly navigate potential concerns around a few high blood pressure readings, cervical scar tissue, anemia or going wayyyy past your due date. You can have a homebirth and still get an IV or anti-nausea drugs or medicine to stop excessive bleeding. You can have a pregnancy where your provider's default mode is to trust you, the mama, and the beautiful baby your body is creating. You can avoid interventions when they aren't necessary and trust that if your provider does suggest an intervention, then it must actually be needed. Homebirth is safe, supportive and oh-so-wonderful.


I never thought I'd be the type of person to give birth at home, on purpose. I used to think of birth as a strictly medical procedure. Now I know better. I know that it can be loving and spiritual and beautiful. Whoever you choose as your provider and wherever you choose to give birth, I wish these things for you. I hope our experience allows you to consider, even if only for a moment, the alternatives out there. No matter how you give birth, though, whether in a tub on your living room floor or by caesarean, you are connected to all of the women around the world and all of the women who have come before you that have given birth. That's powerful. Whatever you do, I'll be cheering for you and sending all of the love and strength your way.

4 comments:

  1. Beautifully written, as always, and so goosebumps inducing. What a beautiful experience you had and what a beautiful family you have. Love you three. XO Clarissa

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  2. Beautiful birth story! I started following your blog because of your pixie cut, but am so glad I stuck around :) My youngest is now twenty one but it seems like I had him yesterday. I loved being pregnant and having my babies (in the hospital, but with no medication or interventions) - so much so that I often considered surrogacy. But, instead, I just live vicariously through brave women like you who are willing to share their wonderful birth stories. Thank you!

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  3. Thank you for putting this out to the universe. I am pregnant midwife, pregnant with my second and will be 42 weeks tomorrow. It is so nice to hear another home birthing mama's story of going pst 42 weeks. I would say you have no idea, but I know you do! Bless! Aliya Caler

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  4. This brought tears to my eyes as I could see from the pictures and the write-up that you were surrounded by so much love from your partner and the midwives during this very important time of your life. I really hope to have midwives birth my baby in February and hope to have a beautiful, loving birthing experience. God bless your beautiful family.

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